Books

Kies je cover, straatfotografie-lover!

Straatfotograaf pur sang Willem Wernsen en yours truly zijn hard aan het werken aan een nieuw, praktisch boek over Straatfotografie: in dit boek bundelt Willem 40 jaar ervaring als straat en sociaal-documentair fotograaf in 101 praktische tips.

Het schrijfwerk van het boek zit er bijna op, nu moet het nog naar layout en druk. We verwachten dat het in de eerste helft van 2019 klaar zal zijn. Ben je geabonneerd op de MoreThanWords nieuwsbrief, dan word je er automatisch van op de hoogte gehouden. Ben je nog niet geabonneerd, dan kan je dat via deze link - je ontvangt dan ook meteen tien gratis Lightroom presets!

Bepaal mee de cover voor ‘101 tips voor Straatfotografie’ en win een boek!

Zoals stilaan een gewoonte geworden is, kunnen lezers van mijn blog en nieuwsbrief mee de cover kiezen. Hieronder vind je een eerste selectie van vijf covers. Alle foto’s zijn van de hand van Willem! Klik op een cover om hem in het groot te zien - met de pijltjesknoppen links en rechts kan je dan naar de volgende foto gaan - of scroll door de grotere versies van de foto’s onderaan deze blogpost. Je vindt het cover-nummer in de rechterbovenhoek. Met het formulier hieronder kan je aangeven welke je eerste keuze is en welke je tweede keuze is. Onder de stemmers verloten we drie exemplaren van ‘101 tips voor Straatfotografie’ en twee exemplaren van Willem’s boek ‘Behind the Great Wall’. Stemmen kan tot 24 december! In de loop van januari openen we de voorintekening, met interessante bonus-content! Meer daarover in de nieuwsbrief van januari! Enkel stemmen die via het formulier geplaatst zijn, komen in aanmerking.

Deze cover vind ik de beste *
Deze cover vind is mijn tweede keuze

Hieronder zie je de covers nog eens in het groot:

06 Decisif - L
06 Decisif - L
06 Decisif - L
06 Decisif - L
06 Decisif - L

5 Tips to get started with off-camera flash

Nederlandse versie? Klik hier.

I know, this sounds like the start of an AA meeting, but I have a confession to make: flash used to scare the (insert your own power term here) out of me. That's mostly because I learned it back in the analog days, where more than a week would pass between making a shot and seeing the mess I had made on the contact sheet. As a result, I was an available light shooter for a long time. Not so much by conviction as by lack of an alternative. Luckily, things have changed a lot over the past ten years or so. Currently, technology has evolved to the point where using off-camera flash is as easy as baking an egg. Or, if you’re the kind of kitchen hero I am, probably even easier than that! With the technology issues (mostly) out of the way, this means that you can now focus on getting the shot you want. The following tips will help you be successful with your first ventures into off-camera flash.

1. Start indoors and with people you know

When you’re starting out, start indoors. No wind to knock over your precious, new-bought gear. No sun popping in and out of the sky to mess up your ambient exposure (more on that later), no people to run into the frame or worse... run off with your stuff while you're figuring out the buttons and dials… Once you feel confident with your gear and you have gotten some good results inside, then take your gear (and your model) for a walk outside! I found it helpful to start with people I knew. There's always a family member in need of a picture!

It does not replace actual hands-on practice, but the cool Elixxier set.a.light 3D STUDIO software also lets you plan shoots ahead and understand how light and modifiers behave. In my upcoming ebook  Light It Up! , I'll have a couple of examples of how I used this software to my advantage.

It does not replace actual hands-on practice, but the cool Elixxier set.a.light 3D STUDIO software also lets you plan shoots ahead and understand how light and modifiers behave. In my upcoming ebook Light It Up!, I'll have a couple of examples of how I used this software to my advantage.

 

2. Always determine your ambient exposure first

When you use flash, you’re basically mixing two light sources, flash and ambient light, and you can determine how much (if any) of both light sources you let into your final picture.

The total brightness of this image (left) is the sum of the available light that was let into the camera (middle) and the flash light that was let into the camera (right).

The total brightness of this image (left) is the sum of the available light that was let into the camera (middle) and the flash light that was let into the camera (right).

Because the background is generally not (or less) influenced by your flash light (unless your model is close to it, see the next tip), you should always set your background exposure first. Especially when you’re working with a model outside, it’s a good idea to slightly underexpose that background compared to how you would expose it if you were photographing it without a subject. That makes sense: the background isn’t the subject, therefore it shouldn’t be too bright or otherwise it will detract from your actual subject. For example, when I have a sky in my background, I will generally set my exposure so that I still have detail in the sky.

This is an example of a shot where I set my ambient exposure for the background. It is slightly underexposed so that I maintain detail in the sky…

This is an example of a shot where I set my ambient exposure for the background. It is slightly underexposed so that I maintain detail in the sky…

This is the same image after having added a flash through an umbrella (and some creative postprocessing using one of my  free Lightroom presets .

This is the same image after having added a flash through an umbrella (and some creative postprocessing using one of my free Lightroom presets.

As a result, your model will generally be underexposed, but that’s not a problem… After all, that’s what you have the flash for, right? After having successfully determined your background exposure, fire up your flash and your trigger and adjust the flash power until your subject is correctly exposed. As a side-note, this is why I love to work with mirrorless cameras like the Fujifilm X-series. If you are working with a DSLR, you always see a bright image in the viewfinder, you never see your actual exposure. For that, you have to take a shot and then chimp at it on your LCD screen. On my Fuji camera's, when I'm working in manual exposure, I can set up the Electronic VIewfinder in two ways: either to show me a nice and bright exposure (which is helpful for framing) or the actual exposure (which is helpful to determine how bright or dark I want my background to be). I have even assigned a Function button to easily switch between the two views. So I no longer need to waste a shot (and waste time) to determine my background exposure. Furthermore, when I make the actual exposure with the flash, I have set up my viewfinder to display the image I just made for 1.5 seconds (or shorter if I press the shutter again). This lets me determine if I need to adjust the power or the direction of my flash, again without chimping! 

3. Want more control over your background exposure? Move your subject farther away from it.

If your model is close to a wall, the flash light that lights her will also light that wall, so it will be hard to control the exposure of both independently. If you want that wall to be darker, there's a couple of things you can do: first, you can add a grid to your light: this will limit the amount of stray light or spill light. But what if you're on a budget? In that case, just move your model (and your flash) further away from that wall. As light loses a lot of power quickly, the bigger the distance between the model and the wall, the less flash light will light that wall.

Same camera and light settings, but in this image the model was much closer to the background...

Same camera and light settings, but in this image the model was much closer to the background...

... than in this image.

... than in this image.

This photo was shot in a white studio. Yet the ambient light was completely eliminated by a judicious choice of aperture, ISO and shutter speed. I kept the power on the softbox the same. In the picture on the left, the model was standing fairly at 9 feet from the background, so there’s still some flash light illuminating that background. In the picture on the right, the distance between the model and the white background was twice the original distance. The distance between flash and model (and hence the flash power) was kept the same as in the first shot. As a result, a lot less light reaches the background and it turns darker. 

This is the reason why it's always good to have a lot of space, even if you're not planning on doing full body shots. The more space you have, the more you can play with the distance between your subject and the background and the more you can light them separately, even with just one light.

4. Use the sun as a free rim light

In a studio, I love working with at least two light sources: one as a main light and one as a rim light, coming from the back. This rim light will create a nice highlight on the back of your subject, separating it from the background and adding a nice 3D feel to the image.

On location, I don’t always have 2 lights with me and even if I do, I don’t always have the time to set up a second light. Nor do I have to. I’ll often use the biggest light source of them all, the sun, to my advantage and put the subject with his back to the sun. This kills two birds with one stone. Not only does my subject not have to squint, but I also get a free rim light. Then it’s just a matter of using the flash to bring my subject up to the desired brightness.

ujifilm GFX 50S | GF120mmF4 R LM OIS WR Macro @ 120 mm | 1/125 sec. @ f/5.6 | ISO 100

ujifilm GFX 50S | GF120mmF4 R LM OIS WR Macro @ 120 mm | 1/125 sec. @ f/5.6 | ISO 100

In the image above, I placed two strip lights behind Rosalinde to separate the leather jacket from the grey background. By the way, one of the things that you'll also find in my upcoming Light It Up! ebook, is loads of gear advice. For example, I really love the Nicefoto strip lights as they're affordable and super quick to set up on location.

FUJIFILM X-T1 | XF56mmF1.2 R @ 56 mm | 1/180 sec @ f/2.8 | ISO 200

FUJIFILM X-T1 | XF56mmF1.2 R @ 56 mm | 1/180 sec @ f/2.8 | ISO 200

In this case, I placed the motorcycle man against the sun. The result is a nice highlight around his outline, which nicely separates him from the background, along with the open aperture I chose for this shot.

The setup shot for the motorcycle image: a relatively cheap ($500) but very powerful 600 Ws portable studio flash (the Jinbei HD600) and a $25 flash umbrella.

The setup shot for the motorcycle image: a relatively cheap ($500) but very powerful 600 Ws portable studio flash (the Jinbei HD600) and a $25 flash umbrella.

5. Experiment with the placement triangle of light - subject - camera

When you start out with off-camera flash, you’ll probably put your light at a 45 degree angle to your subject, with your subject facing the camera. It’s a great starting position but don’t leave it at that. Experiment with the angle of your subject’s face towards the camera and with the angle of the light source towards the camera and the subject…

A couple of sample pages from my just released eBook  Light it Up ! The relative positioning of your light, camera and subject towards each other can greatly influence the atmosphere of your image.

A couple of sample pages from my just released eBook Light it Up! The relative positioning of your light, camera and subject towards each other can greatly influence the atmosphere of your image.

One of my favourite lighting schemes is pretty straightforward. It is called ‘Short Lighting’ and it lights the side of the face that is turned away from the camera. This results in a more threedimensional portrait and works great with character faces, of which there are many along the shore of the Ganges in Varanasi, where this image was taken.

FUJIFILM X-Pro2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ 45.5 mm | 1-250 sec @ f / 2.8 | ISO 200

FUJIFILM X-Pro2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ 45.5 mm | 1-250 sec @ f / 2.8 | ISO 200

Short lighting with a free bonus rim light from the bright Indian sun. Two great lights for the price of one!

Short lighting with a free bonus rim light from the bright Indian sun. Two great lights for the price of one!

Don’t let the softbox fool you into thinking you need a big budget to pull of a shot like this. I could have achieved 90 percent of this look with a $25 umbrella. The reason I prefer a softbox is that it gives me more control over my light, especially in confined spaces, where I can add a grid to it.

Want to improve your flash skills?

On April 1st 2018, the second, revised and updated edition of Light it Up! Techniques for Dramatic Off-Camera Flash, will be released with a couple of cool but time-limited bonuses. If you want to get a reminder when it launches, sign up for my newsletter. You'll even receive a set of ten free Lightroom presets, on the house! 

P.S. If you speak Dutch, there's no need to wait as this book is also available in a Dutch print and ebook version! Check it out here.

5 Tips om te starten met off-camera flash

For the English version of this blog post, click here.

Ik heb een bekentenis te doen (dat klinkt als het begin van een AA meeting, maar soit). Ik had vroeger schrik van flitsfotografie. Ik spreek hier ter mijner verdediging wel nog over het analoge tijdperk, waar er een week voorbij kon gaan tussen de druk op de ontspanknop en het bekijken van het resultaat op een onooglijke contactafdruk. Tegen die tijd was ik natuurlijk al lang vergeten wat ik verkeerd gedaan had. Ik was dus lange tijd een 'available light' fotograaf. Niet zozeer uit overtuiging, maar bij gebrek aan een werkbaar alternatief. Gelukkig is de technologie er zo op vooruit gegaan dat flitsen nu zo makkelijk is als een ei bakken. In het geval van mijn culinaire capaciteiten: makkelijker dan een ei bakken. Zeker wanneer je deze vijf tips in gedachten houdt:

1. Begin binnenshuis en met mensen die je kent

Wanneer je pas begint, doe je dat best binnenshuis: geen wind die je pas aangekochte flitsmateriaal tot schroot kan omverblazen, geen zon die verschijnt en dan weer verdwijnt en die je omgevingsbelichting (zie volgende tip) in de war brengt, geen mensen die in je kader komen gelopen of er met je flitsers vandoor gaan... Eens je meer op je gemak bent kan je dan je materiaal en je model mee naar buiten nemen. Zelf vond ik het vroeger alvast handig om te werken met mensen die ik kende: die zijn meestal iets geduldiger en vergevingsgezinder wanneer er iets verkeerd gaat en er is altijd wel een familielid of vriend te porren voor een nieuwe Facebook-profielfoto!

Het vervangt natuurlijk geen  hands-on practice , maar de toffe Elixxier set.a.light 3D STUDIO software laat je toe om je shoots op voorhand al te plannen en beter te begrijpen hoe licht en lichtomvormers werken. In mijn Engelse boek  Light It Up!  en in de Nederlandse versie  Flash!  komen een paar voorbeelden aan bod.

Het vervangt natuurlijk geen hands-on practice, maar de toffe Elixxier set.a.light 3D STUDIO software laat je toe om je shoots op voorhand al te plannen en beter te begrijpen hoe licht en lichtomvormers werken. In mijn Engelse boek Light It Up! en in de Nederlandse versie Flash! komen een paar voorbeelden aan bod.

2. Bepaal altijd de omgevingsbelichting eerst

De totale beliching in deze foto (links) is de som van de hoeveelheid aanwezig licht die in de camera binnengelaten werd (links) en de hoeveelheid flitslicht die toegelaten werd (rechts). 

De totale beliching in deze foto (links) is de som van de hoeveelheid aanwezig licht die in de camera binnengelaten werd (links) en de hoeveelheid flitslicht die toegelaten werd (rechts). 

Omdat de achtergrond normaliter niet (of minder) beïnvloed wordt door flitslicht (tenzij je model er heel dicht bij staat), moet je altijd de achtergrond- of omgevingsbelichting eerst instellen. Zeker wanneer je met een model werkt in open lucht, is het een goed idee om de achtergrond een beetje te onderbelichten in vergelijking met wat je zou doen indien je een foto zou maken van diezelfde achtergrond zonder onderwerp erin. Immers, de achtergrond is nu niet je onderwerp, maar gewoon context voor dat onderwerp. Om die reden maak je hem best niet te licht want anders trekt dat de aandacht weg van je eigenlijke onderwerp. Wanneer ik bijvoorbeeld een lucht in mijn foto heb, zal ik de achtergrond normaliter zo belichten dat ik nog steeds detail in de wolken behoud. 

DIt is een voorbeeld waar ik mijn omgevingsbelichting instelde in functie van de achtergrond. Die is lichtjes onderbelicht zodat ik detail bewaar in de lucht... 

DIt is een voorbeeld waar ik mijn omgevingsbelichting instelde in functie van de achtergrond. Die is lichtjes onderbelicht zodat ik detail bewaar in de lucht... 

Dit is hetzelfde beeld, maar nadat ik een flitser erbij gehaald heb met een paraplu. De foto is ook nabewerkt met een van mijn  gratis   Lightroom presets . De achtergrond is iets lichter geworden, maar dat heeft niets te maken met het effect van de flitser - die belicht enkel de voorgrond - maar met het feit dat ik de gebruikte voorinstelling de Schaduwen schuifregelaar wat optrekt.

Dit is hetzelfde beeld, maar nadat ik een flitser erbij gehaald heb met een paraplu. De foto is ook nabewerkt met een van mijn gratis Lightroom presets. De achtergrond is iets lichter geworden, maar dat heeft niets te maken met het effect van de flitser - die belicht enkel de voorgrond - maar met het feit dat ik de gebruikte voorinstelling de Schaduwen schuifregelaar wat optrekt.

Het gevolg hiervan is dat je model normaliter onderbelicht zal zijn, maar dat is geen probleem. Immers, daar heb je net je flitser voor, niet? Nadat je dus je achtergrondbelichting ingesteld hebt, zet je je flitser en zender aan en pas je de flitskracht aan totdat je de gewenste belichting op het onderwerp hebt. Even terzijde: dit is waarom ik - zeker voor flitsfotografie - zo graag met spiegelloze systeemcamera's met elektronische zoekers werk, zoals mijn Fujifilm toestellen. Wanneer je met een klassieke reflex werkt, zie je altijd een helder zoekerbeeld maar nooit de belichting die je eigenlijk ingesteld hebt. Om die te zien, moet je een testfoto maken en die dan bekijken op het LCD scherm achterop je camera. Op mijn Fuji's kan ik, wanneer ik in de manuele modus aan het werken ben, de elektronische zoeker zo instellen dat ik een weergave krijg van hoe licht of hoe donker mijn omgevingsbelichting zal zijn, nog voor ik de foto gemaakt heb. Bovendien heb ik in de zoeker ook nog eens een live histogram als ik dat wil. Indien ik onderbelicht, zie ik dat dus al in de zoeker nog vooraleer ik de foto maak. Maar ik kan de zoeker ook instellen dat ik een mooi helder zoekerbeeld krijg, wanneer ik me bijvoorbeeld wil focussen op de expressie van het model. Helemaal mooi wordt het wanneer je een functietoets toekent (ik gebruik hiervoor degene vooraan, naast de lens) om makkelijk te switchen tussen beide weergaves. Ik verlies dus niet langer foto's en tijd met het bepalen van mijn omgevingsbelichting. Maar er is meer: want nadat ik de foto met flitslicht gemaakt heb, zie ik die automatisch tot anderhalve seconde weergegeven in de elektronische zoeker. Ik moet dus niet 'chimpen' op mijn LCD-scherm of alles naar wens verlopen is.

3. Wil je meer controle over je achtergrondbelichting? Zet je onderwerp er dan verder van af.

Indien je model dicht bij een muur staat, zal het flitslicht dat haar raakt, ook de muur raken. Het zal dus moeilijk zijn om de muur en het model onafhankelijk van elkaar te belichten. Indien je die muur donkerder wilt, kan je een paar dingen doen. Ten eerste kan je een grid of rooster toevoegen aan je lichtbron. Dat zal de hoeveelheid strooilicht beperken. Maar wat als je geen rooster bij de hand hebt of je lichtomvormer geen roosters aanvaardt? In dat geval volstaat het om je model (en je flitser) gewoon verder van de muur te zetten. Aangezien licht snel kracht verliest, zal er minder flitslicht op de muur vallen en die dus donkerder worden.

Same camera and light settings, but in this image the model was much closer to the background...

Same camera and light settings, but in this image the model was much closer to the background...

... than in this image.

... than in this image.

Deze foto werd gemaakt in een witte studio. Het bestaande omgevingslicht werd volledig onderdrukt door een oordeelkundige keuze van ISO, lensopening en sluitertijd. Een foto gemaakt zonder flitslicht zou dus quasi volledig donker zijn. In beide gevallen stond de flitser in de softbox op dezelfde kracht. In de foto links stond het onderwerp op ongeveer 3 meter van de achtergrond, dus valt er nog steeds wat flitslicht dat op haar valt, ook op de muur. In de rechtse foto was de afstand tussen het model en de achtergrond dubbel zo groot terwijl de afstand tussen odel en flitser en de kracht van de flitser dezelfde bleef. Het gevolg is dat er minder licht op de achtergrond valt en die dus donkerder wordt.

Om die reden kan je als fotograaf maar beter voldoende ruimte hebben, zelfs al ben je niet van plan om mensen ten voeten uit te fotograferen. Hoe meer ruimte je hebt hoe meer je kan spelen met de afstand tussen je onderwerp en de achtergrond en dus hoe meer je beide apart kan belichten, zelfs met maar 1 flitser. 

4. Gebruik de zon als een gratis contourlicht

In een studio werk ik graag met minstens twee lichten: een hoofdlicht en een contourlicht, dat van langs achteren komt. Zo'n contourlicht geeft een mooie highlight op de achterkant van je ondewerp. Dit helpt om je onderwerp los te maken van die achtergrond en geeft een mooi driedimensionaal gevoel aan de foto.

Fujifilm GFX 50S | GF120mmF4 R LM OIS WR Macro @ 120 mm | 1/125 sec. @ f/5.6 | ISO 100

Fujifilm GFX 50S | GF120mmF4 R LM OIS WR Macro @ 120 mm | 1/125 sec. @ f/5.6 | ISO 100

In het beeld hierboven plaatste ik twee strip lights achter Rosalinde om haar leren jack los te maken van de achtergrond. Trouwens, één van de dingen die je in Light It Up (en de Nederlandse versie Flash!) vindt, is veel materiaal-advies. Zo houd ik bijvoorbeeld veel van de strip lights van Nicefoto omdat ze supersnel op te zetten en weer af te breken zijn.

Op locatie heb ik echter niet altijd twee lichten bij en zelfs als het zo is, heb ik niet altijd de tijd om beide op te zetten. In zo'n geval gebruik ik graag de 'moeder aller lichtbronnen', de zon, in mijn voordeel. Ik positioneer mijn onderwerp dan met de rug naar de zon. Zo vang ik twee vliegen in één klap: niet alleen moet mijn model geen gekke bekken trekken omdat de zon keihard in zijn of haar ogen schijnt, maar de zon zorgt ook voor een gratis contourlicht. Het komt er dan gewoon op aan om de flitser op de gewenste kracht in te stellen. 

FUJIFILM X-T1 | XF56mmF1.2 R @ 56 mm | 1/180 sec @ f/2.8 | ISO 200

FUJIFILM X-T1 | XF56mmF1.2 R @ 56 mm | 1/180 sec @ f/2.8 | ISO 200

In dit voorbeeld plaatste ik de motorrijder in tegenlicht. Het resultaat is een mooie highlight rondom hem, die hem mooi laat afsteken van de achtergrond. Ook de beperkte lensopening die ik koos, draagt daartoe bij.

Zo werd de foto van de motorrijder een paar jaar geleden belicht: een relatief goedkope maar sterke (in dit geval een Jinbei HD600) studioflitser op batterijen en een flitsparaplu van nog geen 25 euro. Nu gebruik ik op locatie de Godox AD600 en de SMDV Alpha 110 Softbox.

Zo werd de foto van de motorrijder een paar jaar geleden belicht: een relatief goedkope maar sterke (in dit geval een Jinbei HD600) studioflitser op batterijen en een flitsparaplu van nog geen 25 euro. Nu gebruik ik op locatie de Godox AD600 en de SMDV Alpha 110 Softbox.

5. Experimenteer met de plaatsing van de driekhoek licht - onderwerp - camera

Wanneer je begint met off-camera flash, zal je vaak je licht in een hoek van 45 graden ten opzichte van de camera plaatsen terwijl je onderwerp recht in de lens kijkt. Het is een goed vertrekpunt maar laat het daar vooral niet bij. Experimenteer met de hoek van het gezicht van je onderwerp ten opzichte van de camera en ook met de hoek van de lichtbron ten opzichte van de camera en het onderwerp... 

Een paar voorbeeldpagina's van het  Light It Up!  ebook (ook te vinden in de  Nederlandse versie Flash! ). De relatieve plaatsing van je licht, camera en onderwerp ten opzichte van elkaar bepalen in hele grote mate de sfeer van je foto.

Een paar voorbeeldpagina's van het Light It Up! ebook (ook te vinden in de Nederlandse versie Flash!). De relatieve plaatsing van je licht, camera en onderwerp ten opzichte van elkaar bepalen in hele grote mate de sfeer van je foto.

Een van mijn favoriete lichtopstellingen heet 'Short Lighting'. Dit belichtingspatroon bestaat er in dat je die kant van het gezicht verlicht die niet naar de camera gedraaid is. Dit resulteert in een meer driedimensioneel portret en werkt heel goed bij 'karakterkoppen', waarvan er nogal wat rondlopen langs de oevers van de Ganges in Varanasi! 

FUJIFILM X-Pro2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ 45.5 mm | 1-250 sec @ f / 2.8 | ISO 200

FUJIFILM X-Pro2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ 45.5 mm | 1-250 sec @ f / 2.8 | ISO 200

'Short lighting' met een gratis contourlicht van de felle Indische zon. Twee mooie lichten voor de prijs van één.

'Short lighting' met een gratis contourlicht van de felle Indische zon. Twee mooie lichten voor de prijs van één.

Laat mijn gebruik van een softbox je niet ertoe aanzetten te denken dat je een groot budget nodig hebt om een foto zoals deze te maken: ik had 90 procent van deze look kunnen bereiken met een paraplu van 25 euro. De reden dat ik normaal een softbox verkies is dat die me meer controle over mijn licht verschaft (zeker wanneer ik hem voorzie van een grid) en vooral in kleinere ruimtes.

Wil je je flitsfotografie-skills verbeteren?

Op 1 April 2018 komt de tweede, herziene en bijgewerkte versie uit van Light It Up! Techniques for Dramatic Off-Camera Flash. Indien je als eerste een reminder wil ontvangen van de release, schrijf je dan in op mijn nieuwsbrief. Je zal zelfs een set van 10 gratis Lightroom presets ontvangen, on the house! 

Light It Up! is ook beschikbaar in het Nederlands als 'Flash! Flitsfotografie op locatie'. Het boek bestaat zowel in een gedrukte versie als een ebook versie

Op Photofacts Academy vind je ook een vier uur durende video-cursus die je alles leert over het werken met losse flitsers op locatie. Lid worden van Photofacts Academy kan hier.

Choose your Cover, Flash-lover!

What's up, guys?

I'm frantically working on the second edition of my English ebook on off-camera flash, Light It Up! The first edition was released less than a year ago but as I am going to self-publish the book from now on, I decided to update it to celebrate this new direction. The first edition was already meaty and loaded with tips and tricks, this upcoming second edition promises to be even better! It's been completely checked and new tips, gear, cases and techniques have been added. I've even included a tip on how to combine panoramas and flash photography, resulting in a whopping 20,000 pixel wide image! As a result, the page count will grow to a whopping 185 but it's an ebook, right? So no extra costs involved. On the contrary, Light It Up, 2nd Edition will be cheaper than the original! I'm scheduling to release it early May, but before I can do that... I need your help!

I need your help!

It's become somewhat of a tradition that I let readers of my books co-determine the cover. I could of course have left the cover the same as the first edition, but because I'm now publishing it myself and because this it's a second edition, I thought I might as well change it. So... below you have 5 cover options. One of them is very similar to the original cover, the others are different. You can vote for your cover by filling out the form below. You need not enter your email address, but know that I will draw three random names from the entries who will receive a free copy of Light It Up, 2nd Edition and I obviously need your email address to inform you if you've won. If you're not subscribed to my newsletter, it might be a good thing to check that checkbox, too, as new newsletter subscribers receive 10 of my best Lightroom presets, absolutely free! (please allow up to a day to receive the presets).

Click on a cover to see it larger. Alternatively, scroll through the images below to see them up close. Don't pay too much attention to the subtitle as it might still change.

Vote here

You can vote using the form below. If you're already subscribed to my newsletter, there's no need to subscribe again - you should have received the free presets already! You can vote until Thursday, March 22nd, 1 PM Brussels time.

This is the cover I like best: *
(Optional): my second choice would be this one:
(Optional) While I'm here, please subscribe me to your newsletter and send me those 10 free Lightroom presets, Piet!
LightItUpCover_01kopie.jpg
LightItUpCover_02kopie.jpg
LightItUpCover_03kopie.jpg
LightItUpCover_04kopie.jpg
LightItUpCover_05kopie.jpg