33 reasons why the Fujifilm GF 32-64 should be in every travel photographer's gear bag...

Recently, my friend Damien Lovegrove published a gallery with work he’d made with the GF 32-64. Just as is the case with Damien, the 32-64 is also one of my favourite GFX lenses. Yet, quite a number of GFX owners tend to dismiss this versatile zoom lens because of its volume and weight (875 grams). They prefer prime lenses like the 45 (490 grams) or the 63 (405 grams). But when you think of the 32-64 as 33 prime lenses in one, all of a sudden it’s not that big or bulky anymore :-) I love having that flexibility from wide angle (32 is about 25 mm in full-frame terms) to standard lens (63 corresponds to about 50 mm). The first is great for environmental portraiture - for which I find the 45 mm prime often not wide enough - and the latter corresponds more to a regular field of view. In fact, 90 percent of my images are shot with either this lens or the 110 and this combo is one I’d recommend to any travel photographer using the GFX and wanting to combine flexibility with portability.

At its wide extreme, the GF 32-64 is great for environmental portraits…

At its wide extreme, the GF 32-64 is great for environmental portraits…

… al while giving you the flexibility to zoom in to 64 mm.

… al while giving you the flexibility to zoom in to 64 mm.

So, I decided to follow Damien’s example but with a twist: here’s a gallery for you with 33 travel images taken with the 32-64 at each of its individual focal length settings. In full disclosure, I allowed myself to round up or down to the nearest integer :-) Obviously, there’s not a noticeable difference between a shot made at 44 or 46 mm, but the difference between 32 and 64 clearly shows in terms of compression, perspective and so on. And sometimes, being able to go as wide as 32 mm was crucial, because I could not back up any further to get everything in the shot that I wanted to. So, another way of looking at the 32-64 is having two primes and 31 options in between, all in one lens :-)

Of course, some will point out, you also lose a stop of light. That’s indeed a factor to consider. As I’m shooting primarily in rather sunny conditions, I tend not to worry too much about this. A stop less of light also means a little less possibility to blur the background in your images, but honestly, at these focal lengths, the difference isn’t that noticeable, I think, and for me doesn’t outweigh the flexibility advantage. And if I want super shallow depth of field, I just use the 110 mm, aka the bokeh monster and stitch a panorama with it to get a wider field of view.

Also, I love the fact that I only have to switch lenses between this zoom and the 110. Changing lenses on a GFX in the field is more difficult because of the size of the lenses: it’s hard to do single-handedly.

Now, having said all of the above… If Fujifilm ever produces a 30 mm f/2 prime, I’d probably walk to Japan to pick up a copy :-)

Panorama shot with the 110 mm f/2 and stitched in Lightroom to give a broad field of view and a shallow depth of field.

Panorama shot with the 110 mm f/2 and stitched in Lightroom to give a broad field of view and a shallow depth of field.

CreativeProfilesMockup100kbfinal.png

All of these images were edited in Lightroom and/or Photoshop, often with my Creative Profiles Starter Pack or my Power Presets Pack. So they’re not straight-out-of-camera files. In fact, the gigantic dynamic range (and therefore tremendous postprocessing options) of the GFX is one of the main reasons I love working with that camera. You can do just about anything with these files! In a lot of images, flash was used. In fact, I prefer taking only two lenses and a flash than more lenses at the expense of having to leave my flash gear at home. In my ebook ‘Light It Up!’, I explain all you need to know to produce these kinds of images yourself.

Learn to make travel portraits like these using flash with this 200 page ebook. The Deluxe version comes with three bonus videos!

Learn to make travel portraits like these using flash with this 200 page ebook. The Deluxe version comes with three bonus videos!

Subscribe to the newsletter and get 10 Lightroom presets free!

Want to join me on one of my future photo workshops or just receive my weekly free Lightroom or Photography trip? Subscribe to the newsletter... You’ll be rewarded with a set of ten free Lightroom presets!

Fujifilm of Sony gebruiker? Bespaar 50% op Capture One 12

Goed nieuws voor wie niet van software-abonnementen houdt…

Nogal wat Lightroom gebruikers hebben het niet zo voor het feit dat je - om van de nieuwste updates te kunnen gebruik maken - een abonnement moet nemen. De laatste versie van Lightroom die je nog als een gewone, zogenaamde ‘perpetuele licentie’ kon kopen, is Lightroom 6 en die software is ondertussen al meer dan een jaar oud, en wordt niet meer ondersteund. Meer nog, bepaalde features, zoals de Kaartmodule, werken niet meer.

Het ene Lightroom-alternatief is het andere niet…

Het hoeft dan ook geen verwondering te wekken dat er flink wat alternatieven de kop opsteken: Alien Skin Exposure, Skylum Luminar en On1 Photo Raw om er maar enkele te noemen. Allemaal beweren ze de enige echte Lightroom-killer te zijn, en alhoewel ze allemaal hun verdiensten hebben op bewerkingsvlak, zijn ze qua bestandsbeheersvlak nog mijlen verwijderd van de Catalogus-aanpak van Lightroom.

Capture One… het énige valabele Lightroom alternatief?

Er is volgens mij op dit moment maar één echt sterk vergelijkbaar alternatief voor Lightroom, en dat is Capture One 12. Dit pakket werkt net zoals Lightroom Classic met een centrale database, waarin de bewerkingen opgeslagen worden. Er zijn uitgebreide zoekfuncties, je kan werken met trefwoorden, gewone en slimme verzamelingen en dergelijke meer. En… je kan het pakket niet alleen in een abonnementsformule aanschaffen, maar ook als een gewone, perpetuele licentie.

Daarnaast bestaat Capture One in een aantal versies. De Express-versie is een uitgeklede versie (die het ondermeer zonder lagen moet doen) en soms gratis met bepaalde camera’s gebundeld wordt. Maar het interessantste is uiteraard de Pro versie. Die bestaat in een universele versie, die honderden camera’s van verschillende merken ondersteunt en 349 € kost.

Bespaar 50 procent op de Sony en Fujifilm versie van Capture One 12

Er bestaat echter ook een specifieke Sony en Fujifilm versie (met ondermeer ondersteuning voor de filmsimulaties), die enkel de camera’s van die respectievelijke merken ondersteunt maar in ruil 100 € goedkoper is. Op die Sony en Fujifilm versie geldt tot 31 maart bovendien een spectaculaire deal: je krijgt namelijk 50 procent korting, zodat je slechts 124 € betaalt. Om die korting te genieten kan je onderstaande links gebruiken. Je hebt geen speciale code nodig. Desgewenst kan je ook een aantal Styles (te vergelijken met Lightroom presets) aanschaffen in combinatie met de eigenlijke software.

Mocht je interesse hebben in Capture One en je bent Sony of Fujifilm gebruiker, dan is nu het moment om het pakket aan te schaffen! De korting geldt overigens ook op de abonnementsformule - al is het mij niet duidelijk of het enkel voor het eerste jaar is of permanent…

Capture One of Lightroom Classic?

Die keuze moet iedereen uiteraard voor zichzelf maken, maar feit is dat Capture One 12 een heel uitgebreid en diep programma is dat zeker bij portretfotografen sterk in de smaak valt. Werk je met een Sony of Fujifilm camera, dan is het pakket op dit moment bijzonder voordelig. In de video hieronder overloop ik in 15 minuten een aantal van de sterke punten in vergelijking met Lightroom Classic. Werk je zelf al met het pakket, en heb je nog andere sterke punten, laat die dan zeker weten. Ook de minpunten in vergelijking met Lightroom hoor ik graag van je.

Bespaar 50 procent op Capture One 12 voor Fujifilm.

Bespaar 50 procent op Capture One 12 voor Fujifilm.

Bespaar 50 procent op Capture One 12 voor Sony.

Bespaar 50 procent op Capture One 12 voor Sony.





Disclaimer: bovenstaande links zijn affiliate-links. Indien je Capture One via deze links aanschaft, ontvangt MoreThanWords een vergoeding daarvoor maar die zit inbegrepen in de prijs. Je betaalt dus niets extra. Die vergoeding helpt om de kosten van deze website en het produceren van de vele gratis video-tutorials die je er op aantreft, te dragen.

What's new in Lightroom Classic CC 8.2

Hello folks, I’m currently traveling to explore some new photo workshop options, so I don’t have access to my regular video tools, but I quickly wanted to drop this video of the new features in the just-released Lightroom Classic CC 8.2. Apart from the usual bug fixes and new camera support, there’s two interesting new features. The first is improved and faster tethering for Nikon users, bringing the tethering experience on par with the one Canon shooters could already experience a while back. The second (starting at 1’50”) is the new Enhance Details option, which lets you extract even more details from a RAW file. In the video, I show you an example and I talk a bit about the pros and cons of the new feature.

I would be interested to hear your thoughts about this new feature. Do you have examples of where it truly shines, where it doesn’t? Let me know!

IMPORTANT: if you are a Windows user, please be advised that in order for the Enhance Details feature to work, you’ll need the October 2018 version of Windows 10. As I understand it, this update isn’t necessary to run the rest of the 8.2 update, only the Enhance Details part as it uses some technology that was only introduced in that particular Windows update.

In other news, if you are interested in joining the Omo Valley Portraits Workshop, there are only two spots left.

Save $10 until February 28 with code CLASSIC10

An Ethiopian Before & After

Starling Travel has just announced the details of a new travel photo workshop that they’re organising with me and Matt Brandon in the epically photogenic Omo valley in Southern Ethiopia. So I thought it would be a good idea edit one of images I took last year during the scouting trip for this workshop in this before-and-after video. I’ll also explain why sometimes I underexpose my images and that - although we’ve all been taught to ‘Expose To The Right’, sometimes underexposing is the way to go.

Image made with the Fujifilm GFX 50R and the GF 110 lens. Want to see more of that combo in action? Then check out the video at the top of this page.

If watching the video made you want to go and take portraits like these yourself, then check out the Omo Valley Portraits Workshop, which will be held from October 25 to November 3. More info can be found here.

Learnt something from the Before & After? Then imagine what you could learn from 2.5 hours of concise Lightroom training and over one hour of bonus tutorials in my brand new  ‘  Learn   Lightroom Classic’  video course.

Learnt something from the Before & After? Then imagine what you could learn from 2.5 hours of concise Lightroom training and over one hour of bonus tutorials in my brand new Learn Lightroom Classic’ video course.

De Steampunk Sessies, deel 2

Deel 1 nog niet gelezen? Dat vind je hier.

Wanneer ik een vrije shoot doe, zoals de steampunk sessie van vorige week, dan begin ik meestal met een paar ‘safe shots’: foto’s waarvan ik weet dat ik het kan. De resultaten daarvan zag je in de vorige blogpost. Het voordeel daarvan is dubbel: ten eerste weet je nooit hoe lang je op zo’n urbex locatie zal kunnen blijven, dus het is handig om zo snel mogelijk iets bruikbaars op je geheugenkaartje te hebben staan. Ten tweede is het goed voor je eigen moraal - en dat van je model - om vrij snel iets te hebben waarvan je denkt ‘we zijn deze ochtend toch niet voor niets zo vroeg opgestaan’ of ‘we hebben hier toch niet voor niets een dagje vrij voor genomen’. Zo’n boost in zelfvertrouwen kan ook handig zijn voor de volgende fase, waar je een beetje meer kan experimenteren. Eén van de dingen waar ik wat meer mee wil aan de slag gaan, is ‘foreground interest’: iets interessants op je voorgrond hebben. En dat dat niet noodzakelijk scherp hoeft te zijn, bewijst de volgende foto.

Double Take

Het idee om The Major tegen de muur te fotograferen, kwam van David. Ik gebruikte drie verschillende flitsers: een strip light met blauw filter camera-rechts, een tweede flitser in een reflector met een grid camera-links en een derde flitser in een reflector met een rood filter, gericht op het pistool. Tijdens de shoot kwam David eventjes te dicht bij mijn camera, waardoor hij - helemaal onscherp omdat ik natuurlijk veel verder scherpgesteld had - bijna de helft van mijn beeld vulde. Toen ging er een lampje branden: wat als ik The Major ook onscherp op de voorgrond van de foto zou plaatsen? Dus maakte ik twee foto’s, op statief, eentje met The Major scherp in beeld tegen de muur en een tweede met hem onscherp, vlak bij mijn lens. Om consistentie te bewaren gebruikte ik dezelfde, van een blauwe gel voorziene strip light voor dit tweede shot. Het resultaat is een foto met meer diepte, meer verhaal, waarbij je al eens nauwer moet kijken eer je ziet wat er gaande is.

Fujifilm GFX 50S | GF110mmF2 R LM WR @ 110 mm | 1/60 sec. @ f/5.6 | ISO 100 | 3 Godox AD600B flitsers

In deze behind-the-scenes-foto zie je de lichtopstelling. © Frank Verheyen. Thanks Frank!

In deze behind-the-scenes-foto zie je de lichtopstelling. © Frank Verheyen. Thanks Frank!

 
Dit gedrukte Nederlandstalige boek (ook beschikbaar als ebook) leert je alles wat je moet weten om dramatische flitsportretten zoals deze te maken. Meer info over  Flash!

Dit gedrukte Nederlandstalige boek (ook beschikbaar als ebook) leert je alles wat je moet weten om dramatische flitsportretten zoals deze te maken. Meer info over Flash!

 

Natuurlijk kader

Het ‘natuurlijke kader’ of ‘frame within a frame’ is een bekende techniek om diepte te geven aan je foto’s: je gebruikt gewoon iets in de omgeving om je onderwerp te kaderen. Het is een techniek waarvan ik vind dat ik hem zelf te weinig gebruik en daarom wilde ik er tijdens deze shoot extra aandacht aan besteden. De imposante gietijzeren steunpilaren waren het perfecte frame. Omdat ik geen telezoom meehad, maar enkel een vaste brandpunt, was het wel eventjes zoeken naar de geschikte compositie die The Major zo groot mogelijk in beeld bracht zonder dat de kruisboog niet meer zichtbaar werd. Note to self: volgende keer een paar ‘apple boxes’ meebrengen zodat ik mijn onderwerp wat hoger kan zetten. Ook in deze foto gebruikte ik drie flitsers: twee op het model en één, komende van rechts en voorzien van een blauw filter, op de paal zelf. Dat blauwe filter moest het koele van het metaal nog extra accentueren.

In de uiteindelijke nabewerking koos ik voor een meer gedesatureerde, grungy look. Het gros daarvan bereikte ik met één klik op een van de profielen uit mijn Creative Profiles Starter Pack.

Fujifilm GFX 50S | GF110mmF2 R LM WR @ 110 mm | 1/30 sec @ f/2 | ISO 100 | 3 Godox AD600 flitsers

Ik werkte hier met drie Godox AD600B flitsers van 600 Ws maar aangezien ik voor dit shot hooguit 1/16 kracht gebruikte, kon ik dit ook perfect met reportageflitsers gedaan hebben op ongeveer halve kracht. Alleen weet je nooit op voorhand hoeveel licht je zal nodig hebben, dus heb ik liever te veel power mee dan te weinig. En… zeker in de manuele versie kost een Godox AD600BM amper meer dan de meeste merkeigen reportageflitsers.


Dat is het voor deze tweede aflevering. Indien je in België of Nederland woont en je The Major zelf graag eens wilt fotograferen, dan is de volgende Epic Steampunk Workshop, die doorgaat op vrijdag 8 maart 2019 iets voor jou. Inschrijven kan vanaf donderdag 31 januari, 20 u. Hieronder vind je een 90 seconden impressie van deze workshop.

Vergeet ook niet dat je nog tot eind januari hebt om 25% te besparen op mijn gloednieuwe Engelstalige ‘Learn Lightroom Classic CC in 2.5 hours’ video cursus. Meer info hier.

Wil je beter leren werken met Lightroom?

Ontdek mijn nieuwe cursus ‘Learn Lightroom Classic in 2.5 hours’.